Monday, August 10, 2009

Heirloom tomatoes

The Ugly Tomato

Bought these at Giant for 3.95 a pound.  Hard to tell, but a slice is the width of a bread slice; the taste will take you back to when you plucked a few for teh dinner table on the way back from the outhouse. Real tomatoes. Gonna buy seeds for next year.

Un-American' attacks ?

Pelosi-Hoyer - questioning Obamacare Un-American attacks
Today's "Blow Me"

Time to Die fot your Gummint

Palin says Obama's health care plan is 'evil'

The inevitable consequence of state run health care
Oregon woman refused treatment, referred to suicide pill

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin called President Barack Obama's health plan "downright evil" Friday in her first online comments since leaving office, saying in a Facebook posting that he would create a "death panel" that would deny care to the neediest Americans.  Now, almost on cue, this year-old story resurfaces as an example of what happens when bureaucrats roll the dice for you.

SPRINGFIELD, Ore. - Barbara Wagner has one wish - for more time.
 
"I'm not ready, I'm not ready to die," the Springfield woman said. "I've got things I'd still like to do."

Her doctor offered hope in the new chemotherapy drug Tarceva, but the Oregon Health Plan sent her a letter telling her the cancer treatment was not approved.

Instead, the letter said, the plan would pay for comfort care, including "physician aid in dying," better known as assisted suicide.

"I told them, I said, 'Who do you guys think you are?' You know, to say that you'll pay for my dying, but you won't pay to help me possibly live longer?' " Wagner said.

An unfortunate interpretation?


Dr. Som Saha, chairman of the commission that sets policy for the Oregon Health Plan, said Wagner is making an "unfortunate interpretation" of the letter and that no one is telling her the health plan will only pay for her to die.

But one critic of assisted suicide calls the message disturbing nonetheless.

"People deserve relief of their suffering, not giving them an overdose," said Dr. William Toffler.

He said the state has a financial incentive to offer death instead of life: Chemotherapy drugs such as Tarceva cost $4,000 a month while drugs for assisted suicide cost less than $100.

Saha said state health officials do not consider whether it is cheaper for someone in the health plan to die than live. But he admitted they must consider the state's limited dollars when dealing with a case such as Wagner's.

"If we invest thousands and thousands of dollars in one person's days to weeks, we are taking away those dollars from someone," Saha said.

And there you have it.  The state will, even in the direst of financial circumstances, find ways to buy luxury jet aircraft to carry them about, but,  by god,  they do know when to put their collective feet down. 

"The state has a financial incentive to offer death instead of life: Chemotherapy drugs such as Tarceva cost $4,000 a month while drugs for assisted suicide cost less than $100."

Yup
H/T Linda SoG (don't forget to vote)