Friday, October 03, 2014

IRS Obamacare Rule


In his decision, U.S. District Judge Ronald White ( George W. Bush, 2003 ) concluded Tuesday that the IRS rule altering the Obamacare law and providing billions in subsidies is "arbitrary, capricious and abuse of discretion":

"The court holds that the IRS rule is arbitrary, capricious, and abuse of discretion or otherwise not in accordance with law, pursuant to 5 U.S.C.706(2)(A), in excess of summary jurisdiction, authority or limitation, or short of statutory right, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 706(2)(C), or otherwise is an invalidation of the ACA [Affordable Care Act], and is hereby vacated. The court's order of vacatur is stayed, however, pending resolution of any appeal from this order."

In September 2012, Oklahoma was the first of several states to challenge the legality of an IRS rule that caused billions in subsidies to be paid out, despite Congress having never authorized those payments.

Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt hailed the state's victory in its lawsuit challenging the implementation of the Affordable Care Act:

"Today's ruling is a consequential victory for the rule of law. The administration and its bureaucrats in the IRS handed out billions in illegal tax credits and subsidies and vastly expanded the reach of the health care law because they didn't like the way Congress wrote the Affordable Care Act. That's not how our system of government works."



Grraham? President? LOL

                                                                      





                                             




Lindsey "Lohan" Graham displays his junk


Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said in a recent interview that
  • he is considering a White House run in 2016 and
  • dismissed fellow Republican Sen. Marco Rubio as “not quite ready” to be president.
  • [Rubio is] a good guy, but after doing immigration with him—we don’t need another young guy not quite ready
  •  “He’s no Obama by any means, but he’s so afraid of the right, and I’ve let that go.” 
"He’s no Obama by any means, but he’s so afraid of the right ..."

Not one a jot of Graham's disjointed statement makes any sense;  let alone have relevance to anything anybody cares about.

Too many Kwinsadinces


More Jindal

                                










(This ties-in with yesterday's Jindal post.)

Jindal is smart, experienced, full of ideas, a solid conservative. So why is he so far back?

First, he is still virtually unknown. To the degree that people outside of Louisiana know Jindal, it is for his poorly received — OK, really bad — Republican response to President Obama's first State of the Union address in 2009.

"He's an undervalued stock," says Jindal adviser Timmy Teepell. "The view of the pundit class in DC, who have not seen Jindal on the stump or interacting with voters, is that he's an underdog without much of a shot. They take the simplistic approach — 'the first time I heard of him he gave a bad State of the Union response, so he can't be any good.' Fortunately, DC pundits don't get to decide elections."

Teepell points out that Jindal has won four elections in Louisiana — two for the House and two for the governor's office — all by decisive margins. When he makes his case to voters, he usually succeeds.

the governor "used the political capital from those victories to make much-needed reforms in Louisiana." The adviser ticked them off: government spending cuts, state workforce cuts, income tax cuts, education reform, health care reform. They were all "massive undertakings that required a lot of political capital to be spent — and when you spend political capital, you spend political capital."
But all is not well at home for Jindal in his seventh year as governor. A poll released this week by PPP, a Democratic firm, pegged his job approval rating in Louisiana at just 34 percent, with 55 percent disapproval. (Other polls have also shown low approval ratings, although some have indicated recent improvement.)

In addition, PPP asked about hypothetical presidential matchups between Hillary Clinton and various Republicans in Louisiana. Bush, Cruz, and Paul, as well as Mike Huckabee, all topped Clinton. Jindal, the favorite son, trailed Clinton by a single point, 45 percent to 46 percent.

If a Republican presidential candidate, no matter where he's from, has even a little trouble winning Louisiana, that's bad news.

Teepell points again to Jindal's election wins and explains that the governor "used the political capital from those victories to make much-needed reforms in Louisiana." The adviser ticked them off: government spending cuts, state workforce cuts, income tax cuts, education reform, health care reform. They were all "massive undertakings that required a lot of political capital to be spent — and when you spend political capital, you spend political capital." [Full Examiner]

Going back, at least to Gerald Ford's 1976 election, the media have been increasingly active in doing an Alinsky (e.g. “Ridicule is man’s most potent weapon.” and “Pick the target, freeze it, personalize it, and polarize it.”) on any GOP candidate that even smacks of conservatism.  So the SUCCESSFUL candidate must have exceptional natural appeal, a glib tongue, and a thick skin to overcome all this.  And that's just to get the GOP nomination! That hasn't happened since 1980.

 The New York Times
will, historically,  endorse the GOPe favorite, and that person will never, ever, be a real conservative; nor anyone likely to beat the Democrat.   Also, and for reasons I cannot comprehend, the GOP have allowed, without court challenge,  Democrats to cross-over  and vote in it's primaries.  That's how we got Dole, McCain and Romney. So, if Jindal, or any conservative, can break through all this, then that candidate will almost certainly become president. What are the odds that Jindal will be that person?  I say 30 to 1. 

Jindal is the only candidate (in the race) who even remotely excites me. My only hope is for the GOP to control both the House and the Senate in 2016,  with the Teaparty faction holding the balance of power.  Then there's at least a chance. Fast forward to mid-2017.  If drilling the ANWAR oil fields is about to commence, then we are on the way to recovery.